News

Peace In Time features in National Trust timelapse (3/21/2016)

Now for something a little bit different…

Peace In Time, from Dave’s 2003 solo album Full Circle, has been featured as the soundtrack to an online timelapse film promoting the dedicated work of National Trust volunteers.

The timelapse sequence was curated on behalf of the charity by Dave’s son, Nicolas, who has been closely associated with the White Cliffs of Dover and the Fan Bay Deep Shelter project:

“Over the last 3 years I have enjoyed spending much of my free time looking after the White Cliffs of Dover properties as a volunteer countryside ranger with the National Trust. Following the successful purchase of the final stretch of the cliffs from Langdon Hole to South Foreland by the trust, after an initial site visit to secure the apparent ‘hole in the ground’, I found myself with an exceptional truly unique project to get stuck into.

That project was the conservation, restoration and documentation of the World War II constructed Fan Bay Deep Shelter tunnel network and World War I sound mirrors that had been part destroyed and largely buried in the 1970s.

Joining Jon Barker early on who was adamant that the trust should preserve the network of tunnels and reinstate the sound mirrors to public view, I quickly decided that it would be a much rewarding and invaluable project in itself to document the ongoing progress through to the eventual public opening.

The final collection of rushes comprising hours of high definition video from most work days of the project remains an equal challenge to catalogue and sequence into a final film later this year, but as a teaser I felt that the separate timelapse sequences should stand on their own ground.

Working with the White Cliffs property office and my father, I knew that his composition Peace In Time, driven by the metronome backing that stimulates a feeling of passing time along with the signature melodic swirling piano solo was not only perfect for the rhythm of the movement in the sequence but morally and politically synchronised with the site and historic White Cliffs, the forefront of war time defence.”

 

Peace In Time was written by Dave way back in 1971, originally titled A-mewsing. The live debut of the demo played by an early Hatfield and the North formation with Robert Wyatt guesting was famously broadcast by ORTF on the French music documentary programme ‘Rock en Stock’, filmed in late 1972 and broadcast in January 1973.

Bootleg audio recordings of the performance had been in the collectors’ circle for some time but only recently the full length video has been leaked into global circulation, first appearing on video streaming sites in late February 2016. Dave previously long held a trade DVD-r copy of the performance but the copyright owner Institut national de l’audiovisuel (INA) have largely denied public access to the Rock en Stock series and sadly this material remains unreleased officially.

The art of Jim Morton (2/1/2016)

Jim Morton is an American artist who came to live in Kyoto, Japan over 40 years ago in order to study za-zen and calligraphy, and has remained there ever since.

It is a well known fact that many of the progressive rock albums from the 60s and 70s have conceptual themes running through them, and their artwork tends to display the same kind of imagery. Quite often it is possible to guess who the artist is just by seeing the accompanying front cover artwork. Looking back, it seems that the cover design could almost be seen as the trademark label of the band or artist. (This was also apparent in the logos that were used by the artists and bands of that time.)

This was very much in the mind of Y. Andow, the record producer of Dave’s Stream album when he set out to find a suitable artist to produce the artwork of a similar kind.

At this time, Dave was living on the eastern side of the city at the foot of the slope which lead to the mountains up behind his home. (In fact mountains almost completely encircle Kyoto.)

Soon after moving there, Dave – who has always been a keen sportsman and sailor as well as a former high-jump champion – was soon frequently walking up the slope to the mountain base and climbing the remaining 700 steps to the summit as a daily exercise.

During those walks Dave would sometimes pass another European man, quietly greeting him with a courteous nod or wave. Eventually they started speaking and came to be on friendly terms with each other. The other man’s name is Jim Morton.

Not long after the producer had started his search, Dave phoned him to say that a friend of his, whom he often went walking with, was keen to prepare the artwork for this new album and had already made a few sketches.

At that time Dave hadn’t realised just how great a talent this friend had for the visual arts, but all the same the producer later decided to have a meeting with him.

Later, after Dave visited Jim’s home and saw some of his work lying around, he instantly realised that Jim would be exactly the right person to do the artwork for his Stream album, and therefore decided to play Jim some of the music from it (which at that time was still only in demo form). After that, Jim started working on the front-cover and soon had a rough impression to look at.

 

The record producer, Y. Andow recalls:

“Looking back to that first meeting, Jim arrived on his bicycle with a very large shoulder bag. Once inside the house he opened the bag and showed us what he had done so far.

I’ll never forget the moment when I looked at the picture for the first time. It showed an image of two women in water, one with an outstretched arm with a Buddha-like hand. The eyes seemed to stare right through me. But what amazed me most of all was the blending of Western and Eastern art in a way I had never seen before. This was extremely beautiful and individual work accomplished by using traditional Japanese brushes and paper, and it was exactly what I had been looking for.

I decided at once to ask Jim to complete the work for the Stream album, just altering a few details to fit our requirements.

Another time when I visited Jim’s house I was able to see him working on his calligraphy seated in the seiza position and wearing traditional Japanese working clothes. In this room, hanging from a roof beam, there was a very large selection of expensive looking fude brushes ranging in size from tiny to very large. Also there was a striking carved figure of a Buddha in the corner of the room completed by Jim many years ago. Looking at that carving I could better understand why he was able to produce such amazing work for the Stream cover. The accompanying “Dave Sinclair” lettering work had also been accomplished after years of practising with the fude brush, and again showed Jim’s originality as well as his skill.

Later, while having tea in another room, Jim pulled out an old European instrument from a case and started to play it. It was the lute.

So now I feel that just as the connections between Paul Whitehead and Genesis, Roger Dean and Yes, and Hipgnosis and Pink Floyd are legendary, the same feeling was shared about Jim Morton and Dave Sinclair.”

 

Jim was originally asked to also produce artwork for Dave’s planned En-Circle and Moon Over Man reissue albums. This is the first time that these artworks have been shown in public, exclusive to dave-sinclair.com

All three of Jim Morton’s artworks show his distinctive calligraphy, using the “Dave Sinclair” lettering set into a cloud form.

Stream in demand (9/25/2015)

Just a thank you to everyone who has bought a copy of Stream from Burning Shed. The demand has been truly overwhelming and Dave is so pleased to have his work made available at last.

The album stock has sold out twice already but we are pleased to confirm a fresh batch has been sent courtesy of the record label in Japan and is now in stock again at Burning Shed: https://www.burningshed.com/store/davesinclair

Stream now available from Burning Shed (8/13/2015)

The big day has arrived! Dave’s 2011 album Stream is at last being made available for international release through Burning Shed, based in the UK.

https://www.burningshed.com/store/davesinclair

This long awaited studio album, recorded mainly in Japan and the UK between 2006 – 2010 was released temporarily within Japan from March 2011 through the AADBEG Crescent label website. The album had been completely unavailable outside of Japan due to unforeseen circumstances arising from the devastating earthquake and tsunami on March 11th 2011.

Along with Dave’s unmistakable and unique writing and playing, a host of other important artists were able to join him on this album, including Robert Wyatt, Dave Stewart, Barbara Gaskin, Andy Latimer, Annie Haslam, Doug Boyle, Morgan Fisher, John Murphy, Roxane Jobling, Yoshitaka Enomoto, Fred Baker, Dave Reece-Williams, Billy Bottle, Martine Waltier, Derby Cathedral choir, and Jimmy Hastings, who played on every track bar one !

Further details of this album, including a comprehensive blog, can be found on the English and Japanese pages of the http://www.aadbeg.com website.

In addition, Dave’s 2010 album PianoWorks 1 – Frozen In Time is also now available through Burning Shed along with the very last 12 remaining limited edition numbered copies of Dave’s 2009 home recordings album Treasure Chest.

Dave and Jimmy with Clammbon at Billboard Live (5/12/2015)


Photographs courtesy of Masanori Naruse.

Many thanks to Clammbon and Billboard Live for an amazing experience celebrating Jimmy’s birthday!

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